WIN A PRIVATE BREAKFAST FOR 4 WITH ARUN GANDHI

The Peace Center 

Take a chance to win a private breakfast for 4 with Arun Gandhi, grandson of Mahatma Gandhi. The winner will enjoy a rare opportunity to spend one-on-one time with this great man who works for peace justice, locally and internationally.

 

Arun Gandhi in New Dehli

Saturday, June 15, 2013 9:30 – 11am 

Breakfast will be held at: Cross Culture Restaurant

62-64 West State St., Doylestown, PA

Tickets are $5.00 each or 5 for $20.00

Drawing will be held on May 4th at the 30th Anniversary Celebration.

Arun Gandhi, peace activist and proponent of nonviolence, will be the keynote speaker at Wells College.

Bapu and Arun Gandhi

Arun will give a talk titled “Lessons Learned from My Grandfather,” expressing the guiding principles passed down from his grandfather, the legendary peace-maker and spiritual leader Mohandas K. Gandhi, also known as Mahatma Gandhi. A speaker of international acclaim, Gandhi has spoken before hundreds of colleges and universities as well as corporate and civic organizations. His unique talents and cross-cultural experiences have brought him before governmental, social and educational audiences in countries all over the world, including Brazil, Croatia, France, Ireland, Italy, Holland, Lithuania, Sweden, the United Kingdom and Nicaragua. Arun Gandhi is a cultural treasure, offering firsthand insights into one of history’s most influential leaders.

Source: Wells College  

“Lessons Learned from my Grandfather: Non-Violence in a Violent World” Arun Gandhi

Arun Gandhi Pacific University Oregon in Forest Grove.   

 

Arun Gandhi – “Lessons Learned from my Grandfather: Non-Violence in a Violent World” from Berglund Center on Vimeo.

 

Arun Gandhi inspires crowded gym at Pacific University with stories, lessons, and hugs 

By Deborah Bloom, The Oregonian 

 

Arun Gandhi to speak at Lane Community College Feb. 21

NEWS RELEASE
News From: Lane Community College
Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Arun Gandhi to speak at LCC Feb. 21

                                                                                                                                                                           

Arun Gandhi Speaker EUGENE, OR – Dr. Arun Gandhi, grandson of Mahatma Gandhi, will present “Lessons from My Grandfather” on Thursday, Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. at Lane Community College main campus in the Center for Meeting and Learning, Building 19, Rooms 102-104. The event is free and open to the public.

At age 12, Arun Gandhi went to live with his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi. Arun will share the lessons that his grandfather taught him, including the philosophy of nonviolence and how people can become the change they wish to see in the world.

The presentation will be followed by a question and answer period and a book signing.

Sponsors include Lane’s Strategic Diversity Direction Committee, Diversity Office, Professional and Organizational Development Office, International Programs, Peace Center, Council of Clubs, Associated Students of Lane Community College, Asian Pacific Islander Student Union, Dr. David and Lisa DeHaas, EWEB, and Eugene Weekly.

For disability accommodations, contact Disability Resources at (541) 463-5150 or (541) 463-3079 (TTY) one week in advance.

For more information, contact Donna Koechig at koechigd@lanecc.edu or (541) 463-5307.

Lane is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. Visit online at www.lanecc.edu or www.twitter.com/lanenews or www.facebook.com/lanecommunitycollege 

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Media contact: Joan Aschim, PIO, aschimj@lanecc.edu or (541) 463-5591
Source: Donna Koechig, koechigd@lanecc.edu or (541) 463-5307

Contact: Joan Aschim

Contact Email: aschimj@lanecc.edu 
Phone: (541) 463-5591

Gandhi’s grandson delivers message of peace!

Here is a preview of an article that Richard Baldwin wrote covering my recent Message of Peace in Buffalo, New York.  Enjoy! 

 

Source: By Richard Baldwin | News Niagara Reporter 

Arun Gandhi and the Dali Lama

A boldly inspirational program to bring peace to cities, neighborhoods, homes and hearts throughout the nation began Sunday in Buffalo, as “Mahatma” Gandhi’s grandson exhorted an audience of 400 people to “work toward becoming good, loving human beings through love, respect, understanding, acceptance and compassion” — for everyone.

“How can we call ourselves civilized if we go on living the way we do without love for one another?” asked Arun Gandhi, whose grandfather was the renowned Indian peace advocate Mohandas K. Gandhi.

 “We need to form a world of forgiveness, and try each day to be a better person than we were yesterday,” Gandhi said during a program called “Peace Matters” in Asbury Hall — sometimes called Babeville — site of the former Asbury-Delaware United Methodist Church.

 The program, subtitled “Creating Peace in the World,” was the first in a series of “Peace Matters” presentations to be sponsored during the coming year by an organization called PeaceWeavers in cities such as Princeton, N.J., Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans and beyond, and returning to Buffalo next November at a time to be determined. PeaceWeavers is based in Bath.

 Paula Connors, a director of PeaceWeavers, said the goal is “to break cycles of poverty and overcome the tragedy of violent crime in Buffalo, then in other cities around the nation and, eventually, around the world.”

Read more: The Buffalo News Original article 

 

 

Agape’s 30th Anniversary with Arun Gandhi

Arun Gandhi Keynote Speaker Agape 30th Anniversary

To honor St. Francis of Assisi whose feast day is October 4 and who is the Patron Saint of ecology, and after whom Agape’s main house is named, this annual event is connected to Gandhi’s birthday, October 2 and Therese of Lisieux, October 1. All of these saints represent the prayer,poverty and witness in the world, which are Agape’s founding principles.

Past St. Francis Day — Agape Anniversary Celebrations have included Daniel Berrigan SJ, Sr. Merriam Therese MacGillis, Vincent Harding, David Dellinger, The Hibakusha (A bomb survivors of Hiroshima); a interfaith gathering after 911, including Rabbi Sheila Weinberg, Muslim community members, Episcopal priest Fr. Philip Jacobs, monks of the Buddhist Peace Pagoda in Leverett; 20th Anniversary at Holy Cross and Agape with Bishop Thomas Gumbleton of Detroit, MI; 25th Anniversary with grandson of Mahatma Gandhi; 26th Anniversary with inter-racial, multi-ethnic panel on an election year.

BRIEF: Gandhi’s grandson returning to Chattanooga to push nonviolence

arun gandhiDr. Arun Gandhi will be in Chattanooga for a week in September to participate in activities designed to highlight the legacy of nonviolence left by his grandfather, Mahatma Gandhi.

Mahatma Gandhi led India to independence through nonviolence. He was assassinated in 1948.

Dr. Gandhi will share how to take “Gandhi’s philosophy of nonviolence into our lives and onto our streets,” Missy Crutchfield, administrator of Chattanooga’s Department of Education, Arts and Culture, said in a news release.

Gandhi’s visit to Chattanooga will include visits to local schools, a social justice and cultural tour, a Connecting the Dots summit and blessing of the Eastgate Library.   [Read more…]

Reflections: Working Toward Peace

Reflections: Working Toward Peace By Arun Gandhi The greatest challenge in promoting nonviolence is the English language and its limitations. The next is our perception, rooted for centuries, that violence is the only way we can resolve our problems.

Arun Gandhi and Yasser Arafat

When my grandfather Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi developed his philosophy of nonviolence in South Africa and wanted an appropriate word to describe it, he could not find one. He rejected “passive resistance” and “civil disobedience,” saying there was nothing passive or disobedient about the movement. He even offered a reward to anyone who could come up with a positive English word to describe what he had in mind. Alas, no one could.

Gandhi decided a Sanskrit word might be more appropriate, as he was planning to move back to India and lead the Indian struggle for freedom. He found satyagraha, a combination of two Sanskrit words, described his philosophy the best: satya, meaning “truth,” and agraha, meaning “the pursuit of.” Thus, satyagraha means the pursuit of truth, the opposite of the Western concept of possessing the truth.   [Read more…]

Harvesting Happiness Talk Radio Welcomes Arun Gandhi March 14, 2012

Arun Gandhi

Born in 1934 in Durban, South Africa, Arun is the fifth grandson of India’s legendary leader, Mohandas K. “Mahatma” Gandhi. Growing up under the discriminatory apartheid laws of South Africa, he was beaten by “white” South Africans for being too black and “black” South Africans for being too white; so, Arun sought eye-for-an-eye justice. However, he learned from his parents and grandparents that justice does not mean revenge, it means transforming the opponent through love and suffering.

Grandfather taught Arun to understand nonviolence through understanding violence. “If we know how much passive violence we perpetrate against one another we will understand why there is so much physical violence plaguing societies and the world,” Gandhi said. Through daily lessons, Arun says, he learned about violence and about anger.   [Read more…]

Arun Gandhi speaks at the Salt Lake City Public Library

 

 

By: Shad Engkilterra

On Feb. 29, 2012, Arun Gandhi spoke at the Salt Lake City Public Library in the evening.

The grandson of MK Gandhi, Arun spoke about religion and overconsumption. He also echoed themes from his earlier appearance in the day at Salt Lake Community College.

“I look at it as an honor,” says Arun about a time that a reporter asked him about Mormons baptizing his grandfather. “The Mormons had found slot machines online him (Mahatma Gandhi) so important that they would like to baptize him and make him part of the family.”  

Arun says that the question brings into focus our tendency to use religion to keep ourselves divided.

“We need to come together because religion according to him (Mahatma Gandhi) is about love,” says Arun. “There are no different gods. There is only one God.” 

To create less violence in the world, we need to change the perception of consumption in this country.

Our economy is based on consumption,” says Arun. “There comes a time when we can’t buy anymore.”

People who focus on making money may neglect their families, their children and their friends.

“Making money is not the only thing in life,” says Arun. “Materialism and morality have an inverse relationship. We need to find a balance between the two.”

 

Gandhi’s Grandson Shares Lessons for Nonviolent Life

Arun Gandhi Grandson of Mahatma Gandhi

How would your parents or caregivers had responded if you had, on multiple occasions, disruptively, and for no good reason, burst into a room where they were either working, or conducting important meetings?

For many, the resounding answer would be punishment, or at least a stern talking to. Arun Gandhi recalled during an assembly Tuesday morning at Hatboro-Horsham High School, that his grandfather, Mohandas Gandhi, did neither.

Instead, the late leader of India, whose penchant for righting social and political injustices through peaceful and non-violent actions, paused from his “high-level political discussions” – which in the mid-1940s were aiming to tackle weighty issues including the independence of his country and the emancipation of women – and simply placed his hand over his grandson’s mouth. With the then 12-year-old Arun Gandhi quieted, the elder Gandhi continued talking.   [Read more…]